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CASTANEDA VIAJE A IXTLAN PDF

In Journey to Ixtlan, Carlos Castaneda introduces readers to this new approach La razón es que “Viaje a Ixtlán” no nos ofrece la continuidad de los hechos. Viaje a Ixtlán has 1 rating and 0 reviews: Published by FCE, Paperback. Booktopia has Viaje a Ixtlan, Las Lecciones de Don Juan by Carlos Castaneda. Buy a discounted Paperback of Viaje a Ixtlan online from Australia’s leading.

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Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Journey to Ixtlan by Carlos Castaneda. Paperbackpages. Published February 1st by Washington Square Press first published The Teachings of Don Juan 3.

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Journey to Ixtlanixtlxn sign up. Is it imperative to read the first two in the trilogy?

Russell nope this is the best of all of them and he includes a lot of necessary background information as he tells the story, but I do often suggest to read …more nope this is the best of all of them and he includes a lot of necessary background information as he tells the casttaneda, but I do often suggest to read the first to before, but if your not gonna read all three just read this one less. See 1 question about Journey to Ixtlan….

Lists with This Book. It is about an alleged apprenticeship to the Yaqui “shaman,” Don Juan. The title of this book is taken from an allegory that is recounted to Castaneda by his “benefactor” who is known to Carlos as Don Genaro Genaro Floresa close friend of his teacher don Juan Matus.

After the work of “stopping”, his changed perspective leaves him little in common with ordinary people, who now seem no more substantial to him than “phantoms. Jul 01, Lauren rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: This is the first in a series of ixtkan which Castaneda wrote after ixtlah realized that ixglan prior emphasis on psychotropic drugs was a misleading and “erroneous” means of conveying viake lessons he gained from his apprenticeship with don Juan.

I began reading with few expectations and progressed with delight at how engrossed I became. I felt and absorbed don Juan’s teachings in a very heavy way.

Viaje a Ixtlan : Las Lecciones de Don Juan

I also found myself laughing out loud at various times throughout this book. This for me is always a good si This is the first in a series of books which Castaneda wrote after he realized that his prior emphasis on psychotropic drugs was a misleading and “erroneous” means of conveying the lessons he gained from his apprenticeship with don Juan. This for me is always a good sign! There are many spiritual guide type of books that just don’t do it for me.

It seems to me that all the ideas in that book have caastaneda articulated a million times before, although in more individualized, artistic and passionate language. Don Juan encapsulates the entire message of Tolle’s book in two sentences: To arrive at that being is the not-doing of the self. This book changed my life and I look forward to reading the rest that follow. View all 3 comments. Nov 16, Joseph Pfeffer rated it ixylan was amazing.

Forty years on, what are we to think of Carlos Castaneda? The Don Juan series, of which Journey fastaneda Ixtlan is the central volume, were initially acclaimed as a breakthrough in anthropological field research. Castaneda, as the researcher, placed himself at the center of his book, writing cwstaneda from the point of view of his own reactions rather than laying out an ethnography.

Journey to Ixtlan became his UCLA doctoral dissertation, and was the most noted book of the series because in it Carlos turns a Viajw years on, what are we to think of Carlos Castaneda? Journey to Ixtlan became his UCLA doctoral dissertation, and was the most noted book of the series because in it Carlos turns away from psychedelic plants and follows Don Juan as his apprentice.

He plays the role of the naive, sometimes dense and blundering student, which makes the book seem artless and laces it with subtle humor. By the end, the apprentice begins to get an idea of what don Juan means by power, and how one can become a warrior in the Yaqui sense. The book takes an almost hypnotic hold on the reader, just as don Juan does on Carlos. Carlos cannot break away from don Juan, no matter how irrational, even crazy, he seems, and neither can we.

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As the book progresses, we become changed in much the way Carlos does. It’s almost impossible not to be infused with his sense of awe and wonder at what don Juan is teaching him, and the sorcerer he is changing into.

Journey kxtlan Ixtlan feels so real, and we get so involved with Carlos’ struggle to learn a separate reality, that we become in some sense believers in his alternative universe. We ixttlan part of it. The don Juan books were runaway best sellers in the 70’s. They were new wave, new age anthropology, and an often dry academic discipline was given new life by this careful, almost childlike transcription of field notes.

The only problem with all this is that the books turned out to be fraudulent. Don Juan was either made up by Castaneda, or he was based on a real person whom Castaneda used as a springboard for fictional tales.

Either way, this was not anthropology. It was the fictional journey of a sorcerer’s apprentice. As Castaneda wrote more castqneda, they became more fantastic, until even his most ardent supporters had to agree he’d left the world of anthropology for some sort of science fiction or fantasy.

In his later years, Carlos Castaneda became the leader of his own cult, something of a Jim Jones figure, a man who apparently induced cataneda women to kill themselves just after Carlos himself died.

So Castaneda and don Juan were discredited, and the man who had sold a total of something like 28 czstaneda books faded away. He is not much read any more, though all his books remain in print. Yet he is scorned by the very academics who once lionized him as viame their profession.

It’s hard to set all this aside while reading Journey to Ixtlan. Yet the book’s ixtan naif style succeeds in making castanedda just castaeda real as it was before Castaneda’s trickery was discovered. In a sense, Castaneda is a throwback to the 18’th century, when there was a convention castanead presenting fiction as though it were factual travel writing; think of Swift and Defoe.

Castaneda’s constant interaction with don Juan, along with his fretting about how this could not be real, has the effect of making it seem real even when one knows it is not. It is as real as the greatest fiction, and it doesn’t lose its hold on the reader even when you know he made most of it up by piecing together all kinds of occult texts in the UCLA library. But it differs from most occult masterpieces in that Castaneda allows the reader to feel the process of initiation, and the doubts and anxieties it generates, in a moment by moment way.

You feel you don’t need to attach yourself to a guru, because Vkaje does it for you. Whatever genre Journey to Ixtlan fits into, or if it fits into none at all, it’s a life changing read.

Now that all the controversy is over and the people who pursue that sort of thing have gone on to other interests, it’s possible to sit back and read the don Juan books purely for the enjoyment vuaje their ideas, their unexpected lyricism, their emotional wallop. Taken just as it is, Journey to Ixtlan is a read of many rewards.

Apr 18, Juliana rated it really liked it. Your trouble is that you have to explain everything to everybody, compulsively, and at the same time you want to keep the fresh newness of what you do.

Well, since you can’t be excited after explaining everything you have done, you lie in order to keep going. If we follow the first, we end up bored to death with ourselves and with the world. If we follow the second and erase personal history, we create a fog around us, a very exciting and mysterious state in which nobody knows where the rabbit will pop out, not even ourselves.

No matter what he does, he must first know why he is doing it, and then must proceed with his actions without having doubts or remorse about them. I read all three, one after the other, while working at the Chicago Womens’ Athletic Club during the summer between college and seminary. Although it appears to be the case that Castaneda, the author, fabricated some of the material appearing in his accounts, including that of his doctoral dissertation which begins the series, it also appears to be the case that he knows a good deal about altered s This is the third volume of the trilogy including The Teachings of Don Juan and A Separate Reality.

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Although it appears to be the case that Castaneda, the author, fabricated some of the material appearing in his accounts, including that of his doctoral dissertation which begins the series, it also appears to be the case that he knows a good deal about altered states of consciousness. While the books may misrepresent the Yaqui Nation and so be bad anthropology, they remain important and worth reading. I’ve classed this volume as psychology [one could also, legitimately, class them as religion or as fiction] because so much of its content has to do with what we conventionally call “altered states” and relegate to psychologists.

What is interesting about Castaneda, however, is that, for him, it is not so much a drug-disordered state of mind creating hallucinations as an entry into other worlds. In other words, the other worlds are real–indeed, they are truer in the sense of being more meaningful than the quotidian routines of our normal lives. Phenomenologically, this is certainly the case to many, whether they experience non-ordinary realities through the use of drugs, spiritual exercise or because such things happen to them, either occasionally or regularly.

Years of campfire tales about extraordinary experiences have led me to begin to intentionally ask people about such things and I’ve found it remarkable how ordinary non-ordinary states are. This raises questions about the typical approach of psychologists and philosophers to such matters–and as regards the kind of society which would put its members in such a Procrustean bed that they’d be disposed to discount their lived experience in order to fit in.

I myself have experienced “other worlds” on a number of occasions. Of course, like everyone, I inhabit them nightly and remember them under the rubric of dreaming. Beyond that, however, I’ve had a couple of auditions hearing voices which weren’t coming from anyone another in the room would have hearda rather unpleasant hallucinatory episode and at least two induced breakthroughs to domains radically different than this one I’m typing in–all of which felt realer-than-real.

Beyond that, the usual psychedelic experience–and I’ve had scores–at least suggests these other worlds, worlds like those described by Castaneda, although one is not entirely thrust into them and out of this one. Jul 23, Douglas rated it it was amazing. I have read all of Castenedas books and this is the one you should start with. The first three books tell the same story, but Ixtlan gets it right and you miss little of importance from the first two books.

From Tales of Power on, I give the books five stars. To those who say it’s fiction, I say so what? The wisdom and knowledge of Don Juan is a priceless gift to all of us warriors on the path of knowledge and the books are page turners of the first order.

Well, almost 10 years has it been now, since I read this book. There have been odd discussions about the truthfulness of of Castanedas books, about Don Juan and the experiences Castaneda describes.

Journey to Ixtlan – Wikipedia

In my opinion I don’t care wether the stories are bogus or true. Castaneda describes his journey as an average guy through different spiritual rituals and experiences, as he is taught by Don Juan about the shamanistic view of life.

I was 16, when I read the book and I loved the way Don Juan perceives the Well, almost 10 years has it been now, since I read caataneda book.